Pedal to zynth via USB . .

https://www.tecontrol.se/products/usb-midi-pedal-controller

or

or

3 Likes

Of course if you’re a DIY type, check out this midi foot controller: Pedalino https://github.com/alf45tar/PedalinoMini and here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pCNSvJ9QiDs&feature=youtu.be
I’m in the middle of building one of my own. Just waiting for my TRS sockets to arrive so I can put everything into a case and plug it into my Zynthian! Then I’d like to DIY some pedals. I’ll keep you posted on my progress.

3 Likes

Hello Wolfpaw, did you finished your projekt and what about the result? Greetings Roman

Hi Roman,

Thanks for your interest. It’s been a busy time in my life (needed to reno a bathroom) so somehow my fun projects always get pushed onto the back burner. However, I am very happy to report back that my first Zynthian / Pedalino foot controller test was successful!

There are still so many things for me to learn, but here’s what I did. Being totally unfamiliar with MIDI over IP, I assumed that I needed to get the USBMIDI or the classic MIDI over the 5 pin DIN working on the Pedalino in order to hook the two devices together. Well, the Pedalino natively works over WiFi so neither of those is required if you also enable the QmidiNet (MIDI over WiFi) feature on the Zynthian.

Basically, here’s the setup I tested. On the Zynthian:

  1. connected to a WiFi network,
  2. QmidiNet enabled, and
  3. A snapshot loaded so the Zynthian will play a sound when a key is pressed.

On the Pedalino:

  1. connected to the same WiFi network as the Zynthian,
  2. pedal (or any momentary switch, or even just two wires that you touch together) hooked up to the Pedalino. In default mode, pedals 1 through 4 on the Pedalino are set up as momentary note on/note off MIDI switches which makes them like keys on a MIDI keyboard.

Once everything is connected, just press the pedal connected to the Pedalino and the Zynthian will play a note. That’s pretty cool! There’s much more to explore, but my first basic test worked!

To build this most basic form of Pedalino, all you need is a breadboard, an ESP32, a 0.96" OLED display, and a switch (or two wires). These basic parts can be purchased for less than $10 total! All this may be old hat for a bunch of people out there, but I’m excited about learning more about integrating the Zynthian and Pedalino.

I can imagine that the Pedalino would be a pretty awesome way to connect organ foot pedals to a Zynth!

P.S. @jofemodo created a new repository on Github for me to post my laser cut boxes (thanks!). I have been remiss in posting the designs, but I will do so shortly. The files require some cleanup which I have yet to get to.

3 Likes

Hi Wolfpaw, ihad allready ordered a ttgo t-eight and compiled the software. I,m still waiting for the hardware. I,ll report if i get some results.
Greetings Roman

1 Like

Hi Wolfpaw, i got all parts and had compile the sources following the hints on the github. It works quit good and will be part of my equipment. Thanks for the link, Roman

1 Like